Monday, 11 December 2017

A Truly Great Horse - Sefton



Sefton was a truly great horse,  surviving a car nail bomb that killed 4 soldiers and 7 other horses from the Household Cavalry on 20th July 1982 in Hyde Park.





He was born in Ireland in 1963, his sire a Thoroughbred and his dam Irish Draught.  He was bought by the Household Cavalry in 1967. An impressive 16hh black gelding with a beautiful white blaze and 4 socks.  Sefton could be quite headstrong and was known to bite, nap and fidget!  

The IRA bomb left him with 38 penetrating wounds to his body, a damaged eye and a severed main artery in his neck.  Thanks to the speedy veterinary attention he survived  but had to have further surgery to remove the metal.


Sefton was named Horse of the Year in 1982 and really captured the public's imagination.  Donations for him funded an Equine Hospital at the Royal Veterinary College campus .  He returned to his regimental duties after 3 months until he was retired in 1984 at The Queen's Birthday Parade in June.  He moved to The Horses Trust where he eventually passed away in 1993. 


Sefton was 1 of 15 horses from his regiment on duty that day and all were injured, although Sefton the worst of his surviving stable mates.  The other seriously injured horses were all shot to prevent their suffering .  Echo, a grey police horse was hit by shrapnel and became too fearful of traffic to return to his duties.  Yeti another black horse suffered nerve damage and was also unable to return to his duties.  

There is now a bronze statue of Sefton at the Royal Veterinary College. 

 
Did you see last week's video 'Basil's Exercises'  on my You Tube channel?   
Horse Life and Love. Please check it out and SUBSCRIBE.

You can also follow me on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter for updates on Chesney, Basil, Tommy and Daisy.

Until next time!
Jo

Friday, 8 December 2017

All About ... Moulds


Like bacteria, moulds can be good, providing antibiotics, or bad, producing disease and spoiling food.  The size of moulds means that individually they cannot be seen by the human eye until there are many formed close together.  Most moulds need a temperature of over 4°C to grow (this is why we refrigerate food), however, many can remain dormant until  there are suitable conditions.  Their ability to survive extreme temperatures varies from mould to mould!



The cells of mould are arranged in threads which then form into a tangled mess - a mycelium!  Each cell has a nucleus with chromosomes.  Moulds produce large number of spores (for reproduction) and some types can then be dispersed by the wind. Moulds can be fungal and non-fungal.  

Non-fungal moulds can be:

Slime moulds: these are further split into plasmoidal or cellular.  Plasmoidal slime moulds are thin masses of protoplasm which creeps along moist leaves and rotting logs.  These moulds engulf their food particles.  Cellular slime moulds can sometimes group together to look like plasmoidal but are usually separate cells.


Water moulds: this group includes rust and mildew.  Some of the worst plant diseases are caused by water moulds including potato blight and soft rot.

Bacterial moulds: eg: Streptomyces griseus which secretes the antibiotic streptomycin


Fungal moulds include Penicillium which produces penicillin, one of the most widely used antiobiotics.  An effective antibiotic, it unfortunately only works on a small number of bacteria and resistance is increasing :(


Chesney is allergic to Penicillin, he had a very scary reaction to it when he was young and so we don't dare give it to him anymore.

Have you seen Wednesday's video 'Basil's Exercises'  on my You Tube channel?   
Horse Life and Love.  Please check it out and SUBSCRIBE.

You can also follow me on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter for updates on Chesney, Basil, Tommy and Daisy.

Until next time!
Jo

Thursday, 7 December 2017

November 2017 Review



November started OK but then went downhill :( So I did not achieve my aims at all.  We have a plan 
now though, I don't think December will be very exciting but hope January will be better.


My Aims for November were: 

1.      Calmness and Rhythm in trot canter
2.      More balance and slower in canter
3.      Correct canter leads
4.      Calmer trots after cantering
5.      Turn on forehand
6.      Shoulder in on left rein
7.      Leg yield circles (spirals)
8.      Small jump (maybe a bit bigger)

This is what November looked like:

3rd - horses all had their teeth checked and rasped today ... all good.

4th - hack out today, fast walking but no jogging!  Basil did whinny a lot but was pretty good really.

8th - lunged, Basil was very good today but had lost a shoe (seemed perfectly sound) and had cut his mouth so I couldn't put a bit in anyway - going to be a few days before I will be able to ride L

Bit foot sore now.


18th - Basil has his shoe back on now but decided to lunge first, he was silly to start with but then very good.

19th - rode in the arena today, not too bad until tried to canter, then he went all tight and tried to buck!

24th - 26th - I organised for someone to come out and look at Basil's back this weekend.  I called the vet to see if they had some names of people they had worked with first.

The physiotherapist watched Basil walk and trot up and down and had a good look and feel of him before trying and then leaving me with some exercises to do with him to try to improve his strength in his back.  I will keep you posted!


My Aims for December are to do our exercises and for Basil to get better.

Have you seen yesterday's video 'Basil's Exercises'  on my new You Tube channel?
Horse Life and Love.  Please check it out and SUBSCRIBE.

You can also follow me on Facebook and Instagram for updates on Chesney, Basil, Tommy and Daisy.

Until next time!
Jo

Tuesday, 5 December 2017

2017 Christmas Wish List


It is that time of year again, so I have put together a few things I am hoping might make it into my stocking (or the horses) this year!


This looks cosy, we have had a few pretty cold days recently which have made me think about what I have for January/February when it could get pretty cold! Ariat Ladies Conquest Fleece £49.99



Basil is desperate for a new numnah, but he is a bit tricky to buy for J Griffin Nuumed HiWither Numnah £32.50




I bet Basil would love this too!!!!  Epiony Therapy Heat Pad £129.99


I desperately need some new boots and I do like these the best, this will be my 3rd or 4th pair.  Mountain Horse Yard Boots £99.00



You can't beat a fun hat in the winter months.  Pom pom hat covers £13.99






Do you think Tommy would LOVE this?  Play ball £19.99

Did you see last week's video 'Top Tips ... for handling horses'  on my You Tube channel?   
Horse Life and Love.  Please check it out and SUBSCRIBE.

You can also follow me on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter for updates on Chesney, Basil, Tommy and Daisy.

Until next time!
Jo

Sunday, 3 December 2017

All About ... Viruses

Viruses can infect every type of living thing including flowering plants, mammals and bacteria! 



Like bacteria they come in a variety of different shapes, including helical, envelopeand even more complex.  Viruses are smaller in size than bacteria (about 1% of the size on average).  The largest being pox viruses which are about the same size as bacteria. 

Each virion (virus particle) is made up of:
·         a core: made up of 1 or 2 DNA or RNA molecules
·         a capsid: a protein coat which enloses the core, it protects the genetic material (DNA) and helps it transfer from host to host ie: spread
·         an envelope: only some viruses have this additional layer which surrounds the capsid



Viruses can only reproduce when inside a living cell and this will also cause damage to the cell.  The virus attaches to a 'receptor ' on the cell surface, different viruses can only attach to certain cells eg: flu virus attaches to the cells lining the lungs and airways.  The virus then 'injects' its RNA or DNA into the cell where it uses the enzymes to make new virus particles (replicate).  The number of virus particles will eventually kill the cell and they will then be free to move around the body infecting other cells.  


As the virus infects and kills more cells, symptoms will begin to appear and this will continue until the immune system is able to fight the virus and overcome it. Some viruses will spread from horse to horse via biting flies or other biting insects.  Other viruses are spread through droplets from coughing or sneezing!  More seriously some viruses are airborne!


Many viruses can be dealt with by the immune system.  Vaccinations (before the horse contracts the virus) can help the immune system recognises the virus more quickly and so overcome it more quickly but antibiotics DON'T work on viruses.

Some viruses will lie dormant within the body and this can also help the horse develop immunity.  Viruses are usually 'host specific' so we can't catch horse flu, however, Rabies is an important exception and can transfer from species to species.

UK Equine Viruses include:
·         Equine Influenza
·         Equine Herpes Virus
·         Equine Infectious Anaemia

Did you see Wednesday's video ' Top Tips for Handling Horses'  on my You Tube channel?   
Horse Life and Love.  Please check it out and SUBSCRIBE.

You can also follow me on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter for updates on Chesney, Basil, Tommy and Daisy.

Until next time!
Jo

Thursday, 30 November 2017

Grass ... mmmmmmmmm ...








  




Have you seen yesterday's video 'Top Tips for handling horses'  on my You Tube channel?   
Horse Life and Love.  Please check it out and SUBSCRIBE.

You can also follow me on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter for updates on Chesney, Basil, Tommy and Daisy.

Until next time!
Jo